Tuesday, May 1, 2012

Nikujaga Recipe

A lady who wants to impress a potential husband will make for him the most basic of home-style Japanese cooking - Nikujaga.  If she gets the perfect balance of flavours to suit his taste, then it's a match and he'll fall in love.
In spite of its legendary powers, nikujaga (meaning meat-potato) is the simplest meal to make.
Meat, potatoes, onions and some carrots.
You're done.

Some people use beef, some use pork.  I generally use beef, however this time I tried pork.  
Ito-konnyaku is also often included, but this time I used a block of konnyaku.
I love Shimeji Mushrooms so I threw some in.

Nikujaga Recipe (serves 2~3)
  • 150g Thinly sliced beef or pork
  • 2-3 Potatoes (Cut into 4ths or if large, 8ths)
  • 1-2 Onions (sliced)
  • 1 Carrot (sliced into chunks - see here how I sliced carrots for cream stew)


    • 4 Tbsp Soy Sauce
    • 1 Tbsp Sugar
    • 2 Tbsp Mirin (or replace with 1 extra tsp sugar)
    • 2 Tbsp Sake, optional
    • 1 Cup boiling water
    • Either ~3g Katsuobushi or 1 tsp dashi powder
    1. Heat a little oil in a saucepan or wok.  Stir-fry the meat and onions for a couple of minutes.  
    2. Add potatoes and stir-fry a little.
    3. Add all the other ingredients except carrots.  Add carrots 5 min later.  Simmer for a further 20 min.
    Test to see if it's done by poking a potato with a chopstick.  The chopstick should easily poke through the potato.
    DONE!

    Serve in individual bowls with a bowl of rice on the side and, if you like, miso soup and a leafy salad.
    Actually the real reason I made nikujaga tonight was that my little boy wanted to cut carrot flowers, and kept pulling the carrots out of the fridge.  I gave in, and as you can see, we had carrot flowers.  
    (that's not the usual way to cut carrots for nikujaga)
    The pork I used this time was not ideal actually.  
    Should have used the paper-thin stuff, or used beef like I usually do and stewed it longer.

    12 comments:

    1. This is on my menu for the week too! :)yours looks delish!

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      Replies
      1. ^_^ YAY we're all having Nikujaga! It's one of the essentials of Japanese home cooking, isn't it!

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    2. I'd miss the texture of konnyaku if I used this recipe.

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    3. Love your blog, made your beef bowls tonight. We lived in Yokosuka for three years and I miss it so much. I have a question, how do you make the carrot flowers? I'm in culinary school right now and the carrots look like they'd make a nice garnish.

      Thank you!

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    4. Love your blog, made your beef bowls tonight. We lived in Yokosuka for three years and I miss it so much. I have a question, how do you make the carrot flowers? I'm in culinary school right now and the carrots look like they'd make a nice garnish.

      Thank you!

      ReplyDelete
    5. I've made this dish before following your recipe to a T! It came out great when I first had it, literally warms my soul. I can see how this dish is a way to a man's heart, it sure is to mine!

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    6. I really enjoy your blog and made your beef bowls last night. We spent three years in Yokosuka, and I miss it terribly. I'm curious as to how you make the carrot flowers. I'm currently enrolled in culinary school, and the carrots appear to be a nice garnish.

      ReplyDelete
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